Making waves in the Windy City

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Riverfront Chicago

A good place to learn more about the river system and bridges is the McCormick Bridgehouse and Chicago River Museum, located in the Civic district between Dearborn St. and Michigan Ave. Don’t forget to check out the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Plaza between State St. and Wabash.

You can also view many of Chicago’s landmark buildings from the walkway.

Bridge Wells Street with El

viagra uk next day delivery Bridges of Chicago

Chicago has one of the largest collections of historic bridges, with somewhere between 37 and 43 movable bridges, depending on who’s counting. They are best known for the trunnion bascule style developed in-state to meet the unique needs in connecting Chicago’s land masses. At least 20 of these are easy to spot in the downtown area. Each set of bridge towers has its own unique architectural design.

Trunnion bascule bridges have leaves that rotate on a shaft, or trunnion, located on the shore. A complex system of counterweights, gears and electric motors, operated by a bridge tender, raise the leaves upwards and away from the center of the river.

During Chicago’s boating season, between April 15 and November 15, over 52,000 boats will pass through the Chicago River. In that time the bridges are opened nearly 30,000 times yearly.

Whether you explore by land or sea, you can find the iconic Y symbol as part of the detail work on bridges, in the memorials and stonework throughout the city. Further proof that if you haven’t been on the water, you’re missing out on the heart of Chicago.

Chicago River